Ethiopia

Securing incomes for women. A women farmers harvests chickpea in Ethiopia. Photo Swathi Sridharan, ICRISAT

High yielding and disease resistant chickpea varieties released in Ethiopia

The National Variety Release Committee (NVRC) announced the release of three new improved chickpea varieties with better yield, disease resistance (wilt, root rot and ascochyta blight) and early maturity for production inhigh altitude areas (1800-2800 m) of Ethiopia. This was the outcome of a research collaboration between International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR) and ICRISAT. The breeding lines for these varieties were provided by ICRISAT and ICARDA. Chickpea crop improvement…

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Participants at the field day. photo: C Ojiewo, ICRISAT

Ethiopian farmers try out new chickpea variety

At a field day organized at East Belessa, Gondar, to create awareness on Ejere, a chickpea variety that is new to the area, farmers expressed their interest to engage in seed production in the coming season after seeing its performance. The Habru variety, introduced earlier, had increased the productivity of chickpea in East Belessa District from an average of 0.6-0.7 t per ha (for the local variety) to 2.4 t per ha. To meet next year’s demand for seed, farmers…

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Demekech, a lentil farmer in Ethiopia

New legume varieties fortify harvests and diets in Ethiopia

Demekech Tekleyohannes, an Ethiopian farmer from Gimbichu has seen her fair share of hard times.  Ten years ago, a new crop disease devastated her field and her only source of livelihood. “We had covered our fields with lentils, but within a short period of time it all got destroyed.” A new strain of rust disease had infested the lentil crops. The local variety of lentil seeds used by the farmers had little resistance to the new disease caused by unusual weather,…

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Strengthening Ethiopia’s production of food legumes

In recognition of Ethiopia’s leading role as a producer of food legumes in East Africa, ICARDA’s Biodiversity and Integrated Gene Management Program (BIGM) recently held its annual review and planning meeting in Addis Ababa to review progress made over the previous year and plan for the future. Ethiopia produces over 2.86 million metric tons, over a total area of 1.74 million hectares: faba bean, chickpea, grass pea, and lentil are all important crops within the crop-livestock production systems prevalent across…

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The beans are known as “white gold” because of the high income they fetch.

International partnerships impacting grain legume culture in Ethiopia

Blog post by Dr Asnake Fikre, Director, Crops Research, EIAR The legume industry in Ethiopia is significantly and increasingly influencing the agricultural system. Now with an area of some 1.8 million ha and production volume more than 2.7 million MT annually it contributes significant volume globally. The national pulse average reached about 1.5t/ha from less than a ton, a decade ago. Legumes are major source of income, nutrient, farm fertilization and farming system sustainability to about 8.5 million (~70% of…

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International Conference on Chickpea for nutritional security in Ethiopia

In collaboration with international and National organization, the Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research (EIAR) organized a workshop on Chickpea themed “Harnessing Chickpea Value chain for Nutrition Security and Commercialization of Smallholder Agriculture in Africa” from30th January to 1st February 2014 at Debre ziet, Ethiopia Ethiopia has emerged as a major exporter of chickpea in the African continent. Ethiopia has largest production area and volume among other African countries. During the past decade, production has doubled (160,000 t to 330, 000…

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Grain Legumes

Grain Legumes is a partnership among four CGIAR Research Institutes: ICRISAT as lead center, CIAT, ICARDA and IITA, along with several public and private institutes and organizations, governments, and farmers worldwide.

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